Black Men, Obsolete, Single, Dangerous?

Black-Men-Obsolete-Single-DangerousHere is the seminal and critical work that helped solidify Haki Madhubuti as an informed, passionate, and caring commentator on Black life, culture, relationships, and the development and stability of the Black community. In Black Men, Obsolete, Single, Dangerous?: The Afrikan American Family in Transition, an integral text for anyone with vested interest in building healthy, thriving Black families and communities, Madhubuti takes aim at some of the critical issues facing the African American family. He offers useful, pointed, practical solutions for overcoming these obstacles and challenges.

The pain is in the eyes. Young Black men in their twenties or early thirties living in urban America, lost and abandoned, aimlessly walking and hawking the streets with nothing behind their eyes but anger, confusion, disappointment and pain. These men, running the streets, occupying corners, often are beaten beyond recognition, with scar both visible and internal. These men, Black men – son of Afrika, once strong and full of the hope that America lied about – are now knee-less, voice-broken, homeless, forgotten and terrorize into becoming beggars, thieves or ultra-dependents on a system that considers them less than human and treats them with less dignity and respect than dead dogs. I am among these men. I will never forgive white people for what they have done to Afrikan-American men, women and children. This is our story, and this time we are not asking for or waiting on apologies and handouts. –Haki R. Madhubuti, 1990

Praise for Black Men, Obsolete, Single, Dangerous?

“Rightly dividing the word of truth, Haki strips away foggy thought, takes deadly aim at hypocrisy and fear, and leads the mental liberation charge one more time in this series of timely essays and poems. This generation of African people does not a lack a prophet.” –Dr. Asa Hillard

“There are those who eloquently define the problems of Black men and stop at the solutions. And there are those who hint at the solutions, but lack the courage and vision to tell us what to do. And then there is Haki Madhubuti who is Black man enough, bold enough, courageous enough, and visionary enough to map out a course to our liberation. Black Men, Obsolete, Single, Dangerous? is a liberating “how to be a Black man” manual that should have been entitled The Joy of Black Manhood.” –Dr. Morris F. X. Jeff, Jr., President, National Association of Black Social Workers

“The plight of Black Men in America has historically posed many perplexing questions. Haki Madhubuti aptly responds to these inquires in a scholarly and insightful work that should rank on the essential reading list for those who are genuinely concerned about the future of African-Americans.” –Useni Eugene Perkins, Director, Portland Urban League

 

One Response

  1. Anthony F. Tyler

    “Blackman obsolete, single and dangerous.” I retitled it the new “120”. A lesson plan to help enhance intellectual awareness.

    Reply

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